• Linguistic Corner: From Shop Floor to Top Floor

    Miloš Matović 21.10.2016 Consulting

    Linguistic Corner: From Shop Floor to Top Floor

    From shop floor to top floor (or in reverse order, from top floor to shop floor) is a phrase used to describe a business organization in its entirety. The phrase is frequently used to emphasize the full integration of all company departments into a unique business system, or to describe technical, structural or organizational solutions that apply to the entire company:

    Our custom ERP solutions enabled the company to optimize and integrate its processes from shop floor to top floor.

    The shop floor is a metaphor for the production department of a company, while ...

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  • How Website Localization Helps Increase Your Sales

    Miloš Matović 18.10.2016 Localization

    How Website Localization Helps Increase Your Sales

    The paradox of globalization is that it is achieved through localization. The more the world is headed towards globalization, the more heavily localized it becomes, products and services are offered in more languages and adapted for more cultures and locations.  The reason for this is that that global does not mean uniform, leading us to conclusion that the paradox of globalization is not really a paradox at all.

    Regardless if it is an interactive presentation of a brick and mortar company or if it is the interface of an online service, website ...

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  • Linguistic Corner: Serendipity

    Miloš Matović 14.10.2016 Consulting

    Linguistic Corner: Serendipity

    Serendipity is frequently listed among the most beautiful words in the English language, as well as among the ones most difficult to translate.

    It essentially means “a pleasant surprise” or “an accidental discovery”, something nice that we find without looking for it. Whether serendipity occurs by chance or by design of a higher intelligence depends on your beliefs, but it certainly does happen to all people once in a while.

    Although it wasn’t frequently used until the 20th century, the term was coined by writer and ...

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  • Linguistic Corner: MacGuffin

    Miloš Matović 07.10.2016 Consulting

    Linguistic Corner: MacGuffin

    MacGuffin (also spelled McGuffin and maggufin) is perhaps best explained in the words of its most prominent advocate, Sir Alfred Hitchcock:

    “It might be a Scottish name, taken from a story about two men on a train. One man says, "What's that package up there in the baggage rack?" And the other answers, "Oh, that's a MacGuffin". The first one asks, "What's a MacGuffin?" "Well," the other man says, "it's an apparatus for trapping lions in the Scottish Highlands." The ...

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  • Linguistic Corner: Mad as a Hatter

    Miloš Matović 23.09.2016 Consulting

    Linguistic Corner: Mad as a Hatter

    There are at least two theories on the origin of this phrase:

    The most widely accepted theory proposes the saying comes from hat-making as mercury was regularly used in the trade and resulted in mercury poisoning developed by the hatters. The second theory suggests that the phrase may actually be a corruption of an earlier phrase “mad as an adder”, meaning “mad as a viper”.

    Whatever the case may be, it seems that madness and hatters came into the English language (almost) hand in hand - Oxford English Dictionary cites the earliest ...

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